Published On: Thu, Oct 12th, 2017

Alarming rise in Indian atrocities

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Editorial

Though India has never been a secular state yet after the coming into power of Modi Sarkar, it has become a state where the basic human rights are denied to people like the including the Muslim and Christian minorities and the indigenous low-caste people Dalits as also Kashmiris in held the  Indian occupied valley of Kashmir.

But off late the Indian atrocities have been exposed at international level. The other day, posters and banners have appeared outside the headquarters of United Nations Human Rights Commission (UNHRC) condemning violence against Christians, Dalits and others by Hindutva groups, demanding rights for various groups and at the same time exposing India’s poor human rights record and treatment of its subjugated minorities.

Posters have been placed on trams running across the UNHRC headquarters demanding right to self-determination for Kashmiris. These banners in support of Kashmir’s indigenous movement of independence from India read “Jammu and Kashmir seeks attention’ and ‘Kashmir needs justice’. Banners on trams also call for ‘free indigenous Tripura’ and ‘free Nagaland”. Dozens of banners and standees have been placed near the iconic ‘Broken Chair’ reminding the UNHRC that extremist Hindu groups are involved in the burning of churches and attacking Christian missions across India at a wide scale with full support from Narendra Modi’s government.

These posters highlight that Christians are being targeted by Hindutva groups to advance extremist Hindutva cause which aims to establish the supremacy of upper class Hindu caste and its agenda.

The awareness campaign is being run by Christian human rights groups and Dalit advocacy groups who have been campaigning to highlight the prejudice and persecution these face in India on account of their Christian beliefs and the caste, respectively.

Earlier last month, a British parliamentary delegation, on a visit to Pakistan, expressed concern over the deteriorating human rights violations in Indian-occupied Kashmir.

Addressing a news conference along with Azad Jammu & Kashmir President Sardar Masood Khan earlier last month, the members of the delegation had urged the international community to take notice of the Indian atrocities being inflicted on Kashmiri people in the occupied valley.

Member British parliament Andrew Flint had said the Kashmir dispute is a human rights issue and urged the world to listen to the voices of the Kashmiris. “I stand with truth. It is the basic right of people to live with freedom and peace. The rest of the world needs to know what is happening in Kashmir,” he said.

Wajid Khan, another member of the British parliament part of the delegation, strongly condemned the human rights violations in occupied Kashmir. The delegation said it would request the Indian ambassador back home to allow a fact-finding mission to visit occupied Kashmir.  Meanwhile, experts say Kashmir is seething and close enough to breaking point that sensible, right-minded Indians are speaking out in alarm against the militarised approach of the government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi towards India-held Kashmir. From newspapers of record such as The Hindu and The Indian Express to widely respected retired military officers, independent media outlets and some of India’s most fearless and respected journalists, the criticism of the Indian government is powerful, unequivocal and growing. The harsh tactics of the Indian state have caused unacceptable human rights violations in the disputed territory and may have already triggered a humanitarian crisis. It is particularly telling that even Indian observers who are otherwise reluctant to acknowledge the disputed territory status of Kashmir are uniting in their condemnation of Prime Minister Modi and the Indian security forces.

 Sensibly, and in a policy that must continue to hold, Pakistan has not tried to intervene inside IHK on behalf of the distressed people there. Not even the most ardent of critics of Pakistan in India have suggested that the current unacceptable state of affairs in IHK has been instigated or sustained by Pakistan. Rightly, Pakistan has adhered to a policy of drawing international attention to the repression in IHK and speaking up on behalf of the people of Kashmir. It must use every international platform, especially various UN forums, to highlight oppression

Conscientious people within India itself have been expressing dismay over these brutalities. Yet aggression is only increasing.

As per available reports, during the last one year alone, over a hundred Kashmiris have been killed; 19,000 wounded, many with life threatening injuries; hundreds either completely or partially blinded by pellet gunfire; thousands of women molested; and 18,000 people arrested whose fate is unknown. Meanwhile, members of minority communities – Muslims, Christians and Dalits – are being lynched by Hindutva proponents for trading or consuming beef, even on suspicion of transporting cows – considered holy by many Hindus – for slaughter. These are all well recorded facts and a subject of deep concern by international rights organisations and sane elements within India itself.

Better late than never. Yes, it is good to see that Indian atrocities against minorities including Muslims have begun to expose at international level.  The HR violations in Kashmir are also becoming subject of debate at international level.

Though India has never been a secular state yet after the coming into Power of Modi Sarkar, it has become a state where the basic human rights are denied to people like the including the Muslim and Christian minorities and the indigenous low-caste people Dalits as also Kashmiris in held the  Indian occupied valley of Kashmir.

 

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